Making moving managable

posted on May 01, 2018 by Dr. Jamie Hartman

As I’m writing this blog, I find myself in the middle of packing up my house and moving to a new one with two dogs who are wondering what is going on.  Here are some tips to help make moving less stressful for your pets!

First off, have an overnight kit for your pet-this should contain food, litter, toys and grooming supplies to last through the first few days of unpacking.  Despite your best effort to label boxes, there is always a chance you won’t find your pet boxes for the first little bit and having this kit will make things less stressful.

As a second part to this, pack your pet’s stuff later in the process.  They will be stressed to see boxes and furniture moving and disappearing from their house.  Leaving their toys, bowls, and beds alone as long as possible will help them retain some semblance of normalcy.  On a similar note, your pet’s items should be some of the first items unloaded to help them feel more at home in the new place.

Keep your pets out of the action.  Prepare a quiet room away from the bulk of the moving noise.  You can also opt to board your pet for the day(s) so they are out of the way.  Pets also are at risk for getting loose with doors opening and closing and people coming and going, so having them secured in a room or crate will prevent this.

Update records as soon as possible. This includes getting your pets licensed in the new city if required, updating tags, microchip information, and potentially finding a new veterinarian.  Get your records from your vet before moving and make sure pets are up to date and all prescriptions are filled prior to the move so things don’t slip through the crack.

When traveling with pets, make sure to check laws-health certificates, specific titers, and/or vaccines may be required when crossing state lines, and international travel has even more regulations.  Some cities have ordinances on which pets or breeds are allowed, or how many pets are allowed at any residence.  Apartments and condos may also have rules on which pets are allowed.  Some places may even require permits for certain animals.

Also, when traveling with pets, be sure to check with the hotels if they allow pets/how many pets/sizes of pets allowed, etc.  Some hotels only have a few rooms that are pet friendly, so booking ahead may be required.  Other hotels require pets be kept in crates or otherwise confined.

Lastly, when letting pets outside for the first couple of times at the new place, they should be supervised.  Small spaces in fences if present can lead to escape attempts.  Learning the new boundaries with invisible fences can take a bit of time to figure out as well.  Since your pet may be confused where “home” is in a new place, if they do escape they may not find their own way home.

Hopefully with these tips and a little planning, your move will go smoothly and your pet will settle in without any issues.  Give us a call if you have further questions or concerns.

Posted in: Uncategorized

Cat Questions

posted on July 17, 2012 by Dr. Jamie Hartman

Dr. Silverstein was recently interviewed in The Senior Scene, a publication put out quarterly for Maple Grove senior citizens.  In it he answered many commonly asked questions regarding cats and their health.  Please check out the current newsletter (pdf link for The Senior Scene quarterly newsletter is located about half way down page).  After September 2012, a copy of the old newsletter can be found here Dr. Silverstein’s article is located on pages 5-6.

For more information regarding common feline diseases, please see our website.  We would be happy to discuss your cat’s health with you whether it be prevention, diagnosing, or treating, so give us a call today!

Posted in: Feline Health