Oh no! Pink Pee!!

posted on December 16, 2014 by Dr. Jamie Hartman

We tend to see an increase in blood in urine calls at this time of year. Mother Nature helps us out by blanketing the ground with snow which immediately raises a red flag when the snow doesn’t turn yellow but instead is red!

There are many causes of blood in urine. Kidney disease, kidney stones, high blood pressure, or kidney infection can cause blood from the upper urinary tract. The lower urinary tract can have infections, polyps, tumors, bladder stones, or prostate or uterine disease. Cats can also have an inflammatory condition of the bladder that can cause blood in the urine (often called FIC-feline idiopathic cystitis or FLUTD-feline lower urinary tract disease).

The first step in figuring out what is going on is usually to check a urinalysis, a test run on the urine. Depending on what is seen on this test and with the physical examination, further recommendations may be made. A chemistry profile looks at the kidney values further. A urine protein:creatinine ratio also further assesses kidney function. Radiographs (x-rays) or ultrasound may be used to look for bladder stones or bladder tumors and polyps. A urine culture and sensitivity may be performed to determine appropriate antibiotics.

Hopefully with a little testing, we can find the cause of the bloody urine and help your pet feel better soon. Call us today if you are noticing bloody urine, or other signs of urinary issues such as licking at privates excessively, straining, attempting to go frequently, or increased thirst and urination.

Posted in: Feline Health

Oh no, pink pee!

posted on December 03, 2014 by Dr. Jamie Hartman

We tend to see an increase in blood in urine calls at this time of year.  Mother Nature helps us out by blanketing the ground with snow which immediately raises a red flag when the snow doesn’t turn yellow but instead is red!

There are many causes of blood in urine.  Kidney disease, kidney stones, high blood pressure, or kidney infection can cause blood from the upper urinary tract.  The lower urinary tract can have infections, polyps, tumors, bladder stones, or prostate or uterine disease.  Cats can also have an inflammatory condition of the bladder that can cause blood in the urine (often called FIC-feline idiopathic cystitis or FLUTD-feline lower urinary tract disease).

The first step in figuring out what is going on is usually to check a urinalysis, a test run on the urine.  Depending on what is seen on this test and with the physical examination, further recommendations may be made.  A chemistry profile looks at the kidney values further.  A urine protein:creatinine ratio also further assesses kidney function.  Radiographs (x-rays) or ultrasound may be used to look for bladder stones or bladder tumors and polyps.  A urine culture and sensitivity may be performed to determine appropriate antibiotics.

Hopefully with a little testing, we can find the cause of the bloody urine and help your pet feel better soon.  Call us today if you are noticing bloody urine, or other signs of urinary issues such as licking at privates excessively, straining, attempting to go frequently, or increased thirst and urination.