May is cancer awareness month!

posted on May 01, 2015 by Dr. Jamie Hartman

Cancer is a disease that touches many of our lives.  Unfortunately, our four legged furry friends are not immune to it either.  According to www.petcancerawareness.org, about 1 in 4 dogs will develop cancer in it’s lifetime, and being the number 1 natural cause of death in older pets, about 50% of dogs over the age of 10 will die of cancer.

Just like in humans, early detection is key.  Symptoms of cancer can vary widely, as cancer can affect almost any system or area of the body.  Things such as vomiting, diarrhea, straining to defecate, weight loss, swelling or weight gain, non-healing sores, pale gums, limping, weakness, lethargy, lumps or bumps, bleeding, or coughing could all indicate a tumor.  It should be noted that many of these signs are very non specific however and may indicate many other illness or issues as well.

For this reason, we recommend yearly to semi-annual examinations in all pets, regardless of whether they are “due for shots”.  A yearly to twice yearly exam allows us to look in your pet’s mouth, feel the skin and subcutaneous layers for masses, check lymph node size, weigh your pet, perform a rectal examination, and palpate the abdomen for internal changes.

We also recommend yearly to semi-annual bloodwork.  Lab tests can help look for anemia, can see changes in white blood cell counts which could indicate lymphoma or leukemia, look for changes in liver or kidney enzymes, checks electrolytes, blood sugar, and blood proteins.  While there is not a test that looks specifically for cancer, these tests can alert us to changes occurring in the body which serve as early indicators that something else is going on.

If we find lumps or bumps or masses, we may recommend a fine needle aspirate or biopsy to collect a sample to test so we know what it is.  If internal changes are found, x-rays and/or ultrasound may be recommended.

If we do diagnose your pet with cancer, surgery to remove it is often the first treatment.  Catching it early means it’s small, and less likely to have spread, both of which increase the chance of success.  Sometimes follow up such as chemotherapy or radiation is recommended as well.

Since cancer is so prevalent in our pets, it is imperative that we find and diagnose it early to offer your pet the best chance at a cure or good quality of life.  If you notice any of the changes above, or your pet develops a new lump or bump, it is always a good idea to have a doctor examine them.  Please give us a call today!

Obesity as an Epidemic

posted on August 03, 2012 by Dr. Jamie Hartman

As the calendars turn to August, one thought enters my mind-food on a stick!  August brings the state fair, and while I know a deep fried candy bar on a stick is not healthy for me, as an occasional, once a year treat, it is okay to indulge.  While many people realize watching what we eat is important for a number of health reasons, these same people may not realize watching what our pets eat is just as important.

You may think an extra pound or two can’t hurt that much, but a pound is not just a pound.  While two or three additional pounds may have very little effect on you or me, they can be quite serious for your pet.  Three extra pounds on a 15 pound dog is equivalent to a 150 pound person gaining 30 extra pounds, and  3 extra pounds on a 10 pound cat is equal to 45 extra pounds on a 150 pound person!

Obesity and overweightness is the #1 health condition affecting American pets today.  Purina estimates that 58% of cats and 45% of dogs are overweight or obese.  This equals 35 million dogs and 54 million cats!

This is a serious epidemic as being overweight has been linked with a higher incidence of a number of health issues including oral (mouth) disease, skin disease, diabetes, pancreatitis, thyroid disease, joint diseases such as arthritis and hip dysplasia, hepatitis, urinary tract disease, asthma, torn ligaments such as ACLs, liver disease, heart disease, kidney disease, exercise intolerance, slower wound healing, increased anesthetic risk, and cancer.

Even more importantly, it has been found that being overweight can significantly decrease lifespan.  Purina did the first life-long study in dogs regarding diet and its effect on pets.  Half of the dogs were fed free choice, meaning they were allowed to eat as much as they liked.  The other half of the dogs were fed 25% less than what the free fed dogs ate.  The differences were amazing!

Dogs that were allowed to free feed had an average body condition score (BCS) of 6.7/9 (4.5/9 being ideal), whereas dogs that were slightly restricted had a BCS of 4.6.  The control fed dogs lived 15% longer-almost 2 years, with an average of 13 years in the control fed dogs versus 11.2 years in the free fed dogs.  Lastly, the control fed dogs didn’t start needing treatment for medical conditions until a median age of 12 years, whereas the free choice pets started needing treatment at a median age of 9.9 years.

What does this mean for your pet?  Simply put, a pet kept at a healthy weight throughout life is a healthier pet, and has a longer average lifespan.

How can you help keep your pet healthy?  Veterinarians use something called the body condition score to assess a pet’s weight, as there can be quite a range of “normal” weights for a specific dog breed.  Body condition score is a way to judge how much fat or muscle is on an animal and is more accurate than weight in judging an animal’s body composition.  It is based on a 1-9 scale, with a 4-5 being a healthy weight.

To score body condition, a couple areas are looked at:

  • Are the bones visible?  Bones such as the ribs, spine, and hip bones should not be visible in most dogs and cats.  Some breeds are naturally leaner and in them it may be normal to see the bones.
  • How easily are the ribs felt?  They should feel as though you are running your finger over the back of your other hand’s fingers.  There should be a slight fat covering, but you should not have to push hard to be able to feel the ribs.
  • Is there a tuck of the abdomen visible from the side of the animal?  There should be a nice tuck visible.
  • Is there a waist visible when viewing the animal from above?  There should be a waist visible.

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If you think your pet may be overweight or obese and would like help formulating a diet plan, or if you would like to prevent your pet from becoming overweight, please contact us to discuss calorie requirements and feeding guidelines for your pet, or visit our website for more information.

Posted in: Obesity